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February 1930

-Feb 1 (weather fine) hauled load potatoes p.m. 3.30 20 bbls 18 4/10

-Feb 2 (weather fine) Hauled load potatoes p.m. 20 bbls $3.35 19 good one. Papa was up to Henry Gray’s working.

-Feb 3

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January 1930

-Jan 1 (weather fine) Arlie hauled 2 cord wood to Cal Smith

-Jan 2 (weather ) We went out on green and soft hauled out some circular wood 2 load.

-Jan 3 (weather warm) We hauled down 3 load circular wood.

-Jan 4 (weather fine) We hauled down 4 load circular wood.

-Jan 5 (weather fine) Had Sunday School and 3 meetings

-Jan 6 (weather fine) We hauled 6 load circular  Erwie helped us.

-Jan 7 (weather warm) We hauled down 2 load circular and I cut some a.m.  hauled 1 load p.m.

-Jan. 8 (weather rainy Big thaw) Dident do much.

-Jan 9 (weather colder) Dident do much a.m. Arlie went up to Geo Fullers got circular saw Went up got 1 load circular wood p.m. roads bad

-Jan 10 (weather stormy) Dident do any thing

-Jan 11 (weather cold 18 below) We sawed circular wood Perley Euwie helped us . Got done at 4:30 p.m.

-Jan 12 (weather fine) Had Sunday School and 3 meetings

-Jan 13 (weather fine) I took Geo Fullers circular saw home hauled last cord wood down hauled 2 cord 2 ft wood for Perley p.m..

-Jan 14 (weather fine) I hauled 3 cord 2 ft wood for Perley today

-Jan 15 (weather rained and hailed) I fixed pole in bob sled and long sled put up load potatoes

-Jan 16 (weather fine) I took load potatoes a.m. 3.50 per 20 bbls.

-Jan 17 (weather cold) I dident do much a.m. Went over met my wife p.m.

-Jan 18 (weather stormy) Dident do much today

-Jan 19 (weather stormy) Had Sunday School and 3 meetings

-Jan 20 (weather fine) I hauled down 2 load wood for m. Campwoods Bake (back) out and hauled 2 load p.m.

-Jan 21 (weather stormy) I split a.m. hauled 3 load p.m.

-Jan 22 (weather fine) I split a.m. hauled 3 load p.m..

-Jan 23 (weather cold 26 below) I split a.m.

-Jan 24 (weather fine) I split a.m. hauled down 3 load p.m.  Bro. Patten got his Baptism p.m. and Milicent (wife of Arlie McIntire) in evening

-Jan 25 (weather fine) I split a.m. Arlie helped me I hauled p.m. 3 load

-Jan 26 (weather cold) Had Sunday School and 3 meetings. good crowds

-Jan 27 (weather fine) I split in a.m. hauled in 3 loads p.m.

-Jan 28 (weather stormy) I split in a.m. hauled 1 load p.m. finished hauled 1 load and splitting

-Jan 29 (weather wind and rough) Dident do anything

-Jan 30 (weather fine) We went up cut birch log took it over to mill p.m.

-Jan 31 (weather fine) I went up to Province got load for Ned Porter a.m. Cut some furnace wood p.m.

 

 

Wellington Bartley and Alice Flewelling family

BR: Claude, Herman, Alden, Vivian, Martin, Austin

FR: Eugene, Katrina, Wellington, Alice, Velma, Grace

Alice was the eldest daughter of Charles H Flewelling and Susan Valley

bartley family2

mlffarm2 copy

Milton F Flewelling Farm, River de Chute, Easton Maine circa 1965.

Built by his father, Charles H Flewelling.

 

The Ladner School, 1928

Easton Ladner School 1928

Easton Ladner School 1928 (Click on image to enlarge)

Source: Star Herald on Wednesday Jan. 31 1990

Left front: Thearn Grant, Roy Flewelling, Boyd Curtis, Ralph Clark and Murray Gray.

Second Row: Viola Gray, Thelma Doak, Naomi Clark, Jean Tompkins, Lila Gray, Vera Clark, Lillian Curtis, Eunice Ladner, Grace Tompkins, Fannie Grant, Joseph Clark, Luella Doak, Ressa Flewelling, Alice Clark, Fern Ladner, and Glenna Clark.

Third Row: Vere Ames, Adonis Ames, Walter Clark, Edna Fuller, Montford Ladner, Beulah Wright, Lena/ Rena Fuller, Paul Wright, Helen Porter, and Miss Anna Drew teacher.

Back row: Eugene Boulier, Ruth Lint, and Dora Fuller.

Photo from Fannie Bolster.

Notes:

Beulah and Paul Wright are the children of Mabel (Flewelling) and Moody Wright and niece and nephew of Milton. They soon would be living in South Africa as children of missionaries.

Montford Ladner and Fern Ladner: son of Banford Ladner and Jennie Flewelling Ladner and niece and nephew of Milton.  Jennie was a sister to Milton.

Boyd and Lillian Curtis, children of Hazel Flewelling and Walter Curtis. Hazel was the daughter of Boyd A Flewelling.

Roy and Ressa Flewelling, children of Roy Flewelling, grandchildren of Boyd A Flewelling.

Gray children: Murray, Viola and Lela Gray, children of Henry Gray and Bertha Doak

Clark children: Walter, Alice and Vera Clark, children of George Clark and Vaida Fuller

 

 

 

 

The Farm

The small Flewelling farm was formed by lot 72 and lot 84.

Lot 72 , 20 acres, was owned by Samuel Flewelling and Amaret Flewelling. In 1889, Amaret deeded the land to her son, Charles H Flewelling.

Lot 84 , 10 acres, was conveyed to Charles H Flewelling by Boyd A Flewelling in 1892.

Charles H Flewelling died in 1939 without a will so his property was divided among his children and their heirs. His youngest son, Milton Flewelling, worked and lived on the farm all his life.

In 1953, all the heirs (and spouses) signed over their portion to Milton.

The children of Charles were Alice, Charles, Mabel, Harvey. One daughter, Jennie died in 1931 so her children, Montford, Fern, Mavis, Louise signed the document. The remaining signatures are the spouses.

flewellingfarmtransfersigners

 

 

With permission from the Easton Historical Society, I have posted this interview with Milton Flewelling:

July 1992 interview with Milton L Flewelling (link opens in soundcloud)

He was interviewed by Richard Barker of Easton Maine one month before his 91st birthday.

Highlights:

  • The most he  planted  was 9 acres of potatoes and never owned a tractor.
    milton and plow
  • The first car he purchased cost  $700. He later sold it to his brother in law, Moody Wright. He bought another one in 1922 which had  “Sidecurtains”. He later owned an Overland Whippet car after selling his older car to his brother in law.
  • He had a hired man, $2 a day and board, before the Depression (Perhaps Arlie McIntyre)
  • Milton inherited the farm from his father. 33 acres in total from two lots.
  • His father, Charles, started tapping trees in 1912 (or 1911) in Canada- 500 to 1000 taps (larger trees would have 2-3 taps)

maplescan0001

  • Milton was married twice, 29 years to each wife.
  • At one time there were 27 farms on Ladner Road from River de Chute to Easton Center.
  • There was a lake ran by the farm where they could skate and swim. They also made their own skis. At times the beavers would build a dam in the stream.
  • Christmas was a great holiday. Sister Alice Bartley and family would come over from Beaconsfield New Brunswick, 2 miles away.
  • Used to go to Clearview New Brunswick down the River de Chute Rd – 7 miles – with a double team for church. They would get home about 2 am.
  • Milton did not finish the 8th grade, had to help tap trees.
  • His Dad was a framer, carpenter.
  • Milton met his wife in Mars Hill at Convention. Corene died in 1954 of cancer.
  • Harvey bought his first truck, a REO truck. Built a body on it for 20 barrels. In 1923, while attending a tent meeting in Charleston, someone threw acid on the tent . His Dad built a body/house on the truck in 1923 . His father Charles, brother Charles and and Moody Wright and 3 children went  to Florida with the truck. After the trip, the family parked the cabin on the side hill and Mr Crabtree bought it and took it to the woods to use when he cut wood.
  • Harvey later bought a REO Speedwagon. 1927. During the Depression, had to park it in the garage due to the lack of funds for gas.
  • Miss Bessie Jackson, singer Tilda Cash, lived in the front room of the house while they helped with the Church in between pastors- “scarce of help”. The two ladies were African Americans.
    bessie jackson 2

    Fort Fairfield, June 13, 1945

    bessie jackson

    Fort Fairfield, Sept. 24, 1941

  • March 26, 1991 was last day he lived in the old house.
  • His second wife Margaret had to go into a nursing home due to poor health. A very hard decision for Milton to make.
  • Dr. told Milton he could eat all he wanted. His response: “Can’t figure out why a person have to eat and not doing anything. “